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MICHAEL B. JORDAN'S EMOTIONAL WORDS ON CHADWICK BOSEMAN

Posted by Crayzon Deeyon on September 3, 2020 at 9:25 AM Comments comments (0)

'I WISH WE HAD MORE TIME'

I’ve been trying to find the words, but nothing comes close to how I feel. I’ve been reflecting on every moment, every conversation, every laugh, every disagreement, every hug…everything.

I wish we had more time.

 

One of the last times we spoke, you said we were forever linked , and now the truth of that means more to me than ever. Since nearly the beginning of my career, starting with All My Children when I was 16 years old you paved the way for me. You showed me how to be better, honor purpose, and create legacy. And whether you’ve known it or not…I’ve been watching, learning and constantly motivated by your greatness.

 

I wish we had more time.

 

Everything you’ve given the world … the legends and heroes that you’ve shown us we are … will live on forever. But the thing that hurts the most is that I now understand how much of a legend and hero YOU are. Through it all, you never lost sight of what you loved most. You cared about your family , your friends, your craft, your spirit. You cared about the kids, the community, our culture and humanity. You cared about me. You are my big brother, but I never fully got a chance to tell you, or to truly give you your flowers while you were here.

 

I wish we had more time.

 

I’m more aware now than ever that time is short with people we love and admire. I’m gonna miss your honesty, your generosity, your sense of humor, and incredible gifts. I’ll miss the gift of sharing space with you in scenes. I’m dedicating the rest of my days to live the way you did. With grace, courage, and no regrets. “Is this your king!?” Yes . he . is! Rest In Power Brother.

 


RYAN COOGLER'S HEARTFELT WORDS CONCERNING CHADWICK BOSEMAN

Posted by Crayzon Deeyon on August 30, 2020 at 1:55 PM Comments comments (0)

Ryan Coogler's Heartfelt Words Concerning Chadwick Boseman's Passing

 

I inherited Marvel and the Russo Brothers’ casting choice of T’Challa. It is something that I will forever be grateful for. The first time I saw Chad’s performance as T’Challa, it was in an unfinished cut of CAPTAIN AMERICA: CIVIL WAR. I was deciding whether or not directing BLACK PANTHER was the right choice for me. I’ll never forget, sitting in an editorial suite on the Disney Lot and watching his scenes. His first with Scarlett Johansson as Black Widow, then, with the South African cinema titan, John Kani as T’Challa’s father, King T’Chaka. It was at that moment I knew I wanted to make this movie. After Scarlett’s character leaves them, Chad and John began conversing in a language I had never heard before. It sounded familiar, full of the same clicks and smacks that young black children would make in the States. The same clicks that we would often be chided for being disrespectful or improper. But, it had a musicality to it that felt ancient, powerful, and African.

 

In my meeting after watching the film, I asked Nate Moore, one of the producers of the film, about the language. “Did you guys make it up?” Nate replied, “that’s Xhosa, John Kani’s native language. He and Chad decided to do the scene like that on set, and we rolled with it.” I thought to myself. “He just learned lines in another language, that day?” I couldn’t conceive how difficult that must have been, and even though I hadn’t met Chad, I was already in awe of his capacity as actor.

 

I learned later that there was much conversation over how T’Challa would sound in the film. The decision to have Xhosa be the official language of Wakanda was solidified by Chad, a native of South Carolina, because he was able to learn his lines in Xhosa, there on the spot. He also advocated for his character to speak with an African accent, so that he could present T’Challa to audiences as an African king, whose dialect had not been conquered by the West.

 

I finally met Chad in person in early 2016, once I signed onto the film. He snuck past journalists that were congregated for a press junket I was doing for CREED, and met with me in the green room. We talked about our lives, my time playing football in college, and his time at Howard studying to be a director, about our collective vision for T’Challa and Wakanda. We spoke about the irony of how his former Howard classmate Ta-Nehisi Coates was writing T’Challa’s current arc with Marvel Comics. And how Chad knew Howard student Prince Jones, who’s murder by a police officer inspired Coates’ memoir Between The World and Me.

 

I noticed then that Chad was an anomaly. He was calm. Assured. Constantly studying. But also kind, comforting, had the warmest laugh in the world, and eyes that seen much beyond his years, but could still sparkle like a child seeing something for the first time.

 

That was the first of many conversations. He was a special person. We would often speak about heritage and what it means to be African. When preparing for the film, he would ponder every decision, every choice, not just for how it would reflect on himself, but how those choices could reverberate. “They not ready for this, what we are doing…” “This is Star Wars, this is Lord of the Rings, but for us… and bigger!” He would say this to me while we were struggling to finish a dramatic scene, stretching into double overtime. Or while he was covered in body paint, doing his own stunts. Or crashing into frigid water, and foam landing pads. I would nod and smile, but I didn’t believe him. I had no idea if the film would work. I wasn’t sure I knew what I was doing. But I look back and realize that Chad knew something we all didn’t. He was playing the long game. All while putting in the work. And work he did.

 

He would come to auditions for supporting roles, which is not common for lead actors in big budget movies. He was there for several M’Baku auditions. In Winston Duke’s, he turned a chemistry read into a wrestling match. Winston broke his bracelet. In Letitia Wright’s audition for Shuri, she pierced his royal poise with her signature humor, and would bring about a smile to T’Challa’s face that was 100% Chad.

 

While filming the movie, we would meet at the office or at my rental home in Atlanta, to discuss lines and different ways to add depth to each scene. We talked costumes, military practices. He said to me “Wakandans have to dance during the coronations. If they just stand there with spears, what separates them from Romans?” In early drafts of the script. Eric Killmonger’s character would ask T’Challa to be buried in Wakanda. Chad challenged that and asked, what if Killmonger asked to be buried somewhere else?

 

Chad deeply valued his privacy, and I wasn’t privy to the details of his illness. After his family released their statement, I realized that he was living with his illness the entire time I knew him. Because he was a caretaker, a leader, and a man of faith, dignity and pride, he shielded his collaborators from his suffering. He lived a beautiful life. And he made great art. Day after day, year after year. That was who he was. He was an epic firework display. I will tell stories about being there for some of the brilliant sparks till the end of my days. What an incredible mark he’s left for us.

 

I haven’t grieved a loss this acute before. I spent the last year preparing, imagining and writing words for him to say, that we weren’t destined to see. It leaves me broken knowing that I won’t be able to watch another close-up of him in the monitor again or walk up to him and ask for another take.

 

It hurts more to know that we can’t have another conversation, or facetime, or text message exchange. He would send vegetarian recipes and eating regimens for my family and me to follow during the pandemic. He would check in on me and my loved ones, even as he dealt with the scourge of cancer.

 

In African cultures we often refer to loved ones that have passed on as ancestors. Sometimes you are genetically related. Sometimes you are not. I had the privilege of directing scenes of Chad’s character, T’Challa, communicating with the ancestors of Wakanda. We were in Atlanta, in an abandoned warehouse, with bluescreens, and massive movie lights, but Chad’s performance made it feel real. I think it was because from the time that I met him, the ancestors spoke through him. It’s no secret to me now how he was able to skillfully portray some of our most notable ones. I had no doubt that he would live on and continue to bless us with more. But it is with a heavy heart and a sense of deep gratitude to have ever been in his presence, that I have to reckon with the fact that Chad is an ancestor now. And I know that he will watch over us, until we meet again.

TFR WRITTEN BLOG - 'THE UP NEXT' ELVIS NOLASCO | LORDLANDFILMS.COM

Posted by Crayzon Deeyon on October 16, 2019 at 6:00 PM Comments comments (4)

TFR WRITTEN BLOG - 'THE UP NEXT' ELVIS NOLASCO

Have you seen this man? Have you seen this actor Elvis Nolasco, doing what he does on Big Screen and small screen? If you have not caught on to his ability, you are missing out on ‘the next up’ headed to leading man status in film.


- Also Read The Review @ Lordlandfilms.com Website -


We at The Film Review: Movies Music Culture Politics Society Podcast first took notice to Elvis when he portrayed Carter Nix in the first season of ‘American Crime’. A story of a wrongfully accused man, who’s out to prove his innocence, but pays the price due to the accusation. The end is heartbreaking, and this is where Elvis shines.


He shines in roles where he portrays the tragic, because tragedy is the drive within theatre, movies and Netflix.


In 40 Acres and a Mule Filmworks | Spike Lee’s She’s Gotta Have It’, as Papo “Da Mayor”, in an ever-more gentrified Brooklyn, New York, his use of silence, being a misplaced being in his own neighborhood, misunderstood, causes the conflict reminiscent of ‘Do The Right Thing’, and how his character develops, is brought about by Nolasco’s use of nuance, and actor choice to open-up the character in later episodes.


His work is so prolific from ‘I Like it Like That’ 1994 to ‘New York Undercover’ to ‘Clockers’ to ‘NYPD Blue’ 1997 to ‘Law & Order: SVU’ 2004 to ‘Oldboy’ 2013 to ‘Da Sweet Blood of Jesus’ 2014 to ‘American Crime’ 2015 to ‘Claws’ 2017 to ‘She’s Gotta Have It’ 2017.


Now we see him in ‘David Makes Man’ 2019 as “Tio-Teo”, and in ‘Godfather of Harlem’ as Bumpy Johnson’s righthand man, “Jacob (Nat) Pettigrew”. Both roles deal with drug dealers, but again—it is the nuance Elvis utilizes from all of the experiences he’s experienced playing the various roles he’s portrayed, which make each character fresh; new to the viewer’s eye, which makes him believable acting in two different episodic shows, showing during the same week.


He plays the non-father father figure/no good drug dealer type, “Tio-Teo” to Akili McDowell’s “David”, playing his position as a heavy, who McDowell’s character must overcome in ‘David’. And, in ‘Godfather’ he portrays a cool-laid-back yet sadistic narcotics lieutenant, “Nat Pettigrew” to Forest Whitaker’s no bullshit “Bumpy Johnson”.


Watching a scene which happens, where Elvis, Forest and Erik Ray Harvey “Del Chance” discuss a situation happening within the character’s Johnson’s world, we soon see Nolasco holds his own, acting opposite Whitaker’s veteran actor choices.


We here at The Film Review: Movies Music Culture Politics Society Podcast #Salute Elvis Nolasco, and we predict he is ‘The Next Up’.

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Crazy Dee is an freelance writer who reviews films for

The Film Review: Movies Music Culture Politics Society Podcast

© 2019 Lordlandfilms.com, All Rights Reserved.


THE TRUTH ABOUT SPENCE PORTER FIGHT

Posted by Crayzon Deeyon on September 29, 2019 at 11:15 AM Comments comments (1)



Here’s the truth about the Errol Spence Shawn Porter fight. IT DID NOT DISAPPOINT. From the opening bell Spence and Porter executed their game plan, which made the bout more entertaining than the famed fights of lore. Each circling the other, Porter boxing while Spence stood his ground stalking.


It did not take long for the leather to fly, as both men stood toe to toe in exchanges of shots that would leave lesser men down for the count. As Spence, ever stalking, moved forward, Porter would turn him, and fire shots from various awkward angles of deliver, connecting on Spence, who returned fire, often initiating the exchanges.


Neither man giving an inch, until the 11th around where Spence delivered a left-hook, distorting Porter’s face, in slowmo replay, causing Porter’s eyes to rollback into his head, but was it conditioning or the heart of a champion? The only reaction from Shawn Porter to Errol Spence’s power was to touch his glove to the canvas, receiving the 8-count from the referee.


Post-fight, the evidence that there was a war going on, in the ring for 12-rounds, was evident on Spence’s face, which appeared bruised, with a cut from an accidental headbutt. Porter appeared none the worse for wear, but internally, those body shots Spence delivered, constantly during the fight, must have caused him discomfort after.


Undoubtedly, this war will go up as the fight of the year, if not one of the best of all-time. But what it has caused both men will only show in the future. A bruising-fight changes a fighter, and Porter being in so many, due to his style of Boxing, conditions him to fight on.


What of Errol ‘The Truth’ Spence? In the post-fight it appeared, Spence seemed to have aged. Though Porter lost by 12-round split decision, he took something from Spence. He took some of his youth. A good war of a fight will do that to a Boxer, putting years onto him—years which can only be measured in the ring.


It was not the experience, nor the performance Errol expected by his demeaner post-fight. Willing to give Shawn his just due, but not willing to give Porter his part in making the fight, Spence claimed it to be all-him why the fight did the numbers it did on pay-per-view.


And, this is where the topic of Cleveland, Ohio came up, which caused the end of the post-fight interviews, and the eruption of Cleveland, and a nappy-headed blonde Caucasian woman to call an end to the post-fight, which end was disappointing to the viewer. If you are around Black people, but once, as it is known by the community to happen, it gets rowdy—if you can’t handle it—and become fearful—maybe just maybe you shouldn’t be the one supervising the event. That topic for another time.


Back to the Cleveland reference Errol so easily utter from his lips. “Cleveland is the city where we come from, so run run run.” Cleveland is a city that loves to hate what it loves; Errol should take note. It’s a city where one has to be liken-to Jesus of Nazareth, having to travel out of Nazareth to have his message heard, and then returning once his popularity’s made.


It’s not like Houston or Dallas where groups creating music are supported. It’s not until they make it big someplace-else that revelry and celebration is bestowed upon them, but let the topic of Cleveland come up, let one spit negativity concerning the ability of one from Cleveland to build a fanbase, like Errol did—watch the place erupt. It’s the city that shows love, but hates what it loves, and Spence gained no points in the love department.


It’s possibly the Polish-German influence on the city, because those people (Germans and Polish) know how to gripe, to an unbearable complaining, just listen to sports talk radio, after a Cleveland Browns game. They will complain their way out of coaches, quarterbacks and receivers. And, that influence, where sports and entertainment is concerned, makes it appear the city loves outside influencers better than its own, but don’t sleep. People got a taste of what breeds in a Cleveland-heart, as Porter, his father and team stood cool, calm and composed, while Spence and his team were up and out.


It becomes evident, the love Cleveland has for its own, when a group of Cleveland natives get together, like experienced during the Mayweather/Pacquiao fight. It’s like a family reunion, like no other city.


So, a split decision win for Errol ‘The Truth’ Spence vs. ‘Showtime’ Shawn Porter, here’s one who is calling for the rematch. It was too close to call, and as far as the judges with 111-116, are they blind or are they bought? Particularly, along with the outcome of the fight, with what happened during the post-fight, with Spence being snippy about his less than ‘The Truth’ performance, and Shawn Porter showing up, giving us true ‘Showtime’, a rematch is most definitely warranted! Question is—will Errol Spence be up for it?


Written by Crayzon Deeyon, a freelance writer for The Film Review: Movies Music Culture Politics Society Podcast.

TOP-10 BLAXPLOITATION HORROR MOVIES OF ALL-TIME

Posted by Crayzon Deeyon on September 25, 2019 at 11:55 AM Comments comments (0)

TOP-10 BLAXPLOITATION HORROR MOVIES OF ALL-TIME


Beginning in the early 70's, a type of film began to be produced, as his-story tells it: 1.) Because of white-flight to suburban areas, the movie theaters, in the inner city, saw a decline in revenue, and the movie studios who owned many of the cinemas, in the inner city, answered by producing low-budget movies whose subject matter interested the new inner city movie-goer, but really: 2.) It was the cry from the movie-going public who did not see themselves in films, much. And, if they did, they'd see themselves as the maid the butler the comic relief or the criminal.


The cry for something new, along with the artists, of that era, calling for roles they could portray, which would shine a different light on what the pale underbelly had produced, previously concerning Black People in America, birthed Soul 70's Cinema. But, due to a disagreement-- a Black man would label the new genre 'Blaxploitation', casting a negative connote on what should be haralded as a great era for Black Artistic Expression.


Here, we do not deal with not the cause and affect labeling of Soul Cinema as 'Blaxploitation', but we celebrate Blaxploitation, and a subgenre created, Blaxploitation Horror Movies. Here is TFR's Top-10 Blaxploitation Horror Movies of All-Time:


   1.) Scream Blacula Scream - 1973

  2.) Blacula - 1972

  3.) Vampire In Brooklyn - 1995

  4.) Def By Temptation - 1990

  5.) Petey Wheatstraw: The Devil's Son-In-Law - 1977

  6.) JD's Revenge - 1976

  7.) Blackenstein - 1973

  8.) Now Eat - 2000

  9.) Tales From The Hood - 1995

10.) Bones - 2001

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Honorable Mentions: Us - 2019 , Abby - 1974, Dr. Black and Mr. Hyde - 1976; TBIC: The Shifter - 2011.


Add these films to your Halloween viewing in October, and celebrate an era which brought some of the best actors to the fore, producing entertainment, watched by all, but produced to bring heroes and ourstory for Us.

Written by Crayzon Deeyon, a freelance writer for The Film Review: Movies Music Culture Politics Society Podcast. 

NETFLIX MAKES A MISSTEP CANCELING LEE'S 'GOTTA HAVE IT'

Posted by Crayzon Deeyon on July 18, 2019 at 10:45 AM Comments comments (0)

NETFLIX MAKES A MISSTEP CANCELING LEE'S 'GOTTA HAVE IT'

#TFRReport - Netflix Cancels She's Gotta Have It!

40 Acres and a Mule Filmworks | Spike Lee is shopping the show, for the 3rd-Season.

This un-development is a disappointment, and a poor decision on Netflix's part. Our #TFRPodcastLive Show. this weekend, was/and is still about the genius of Spike Lee flipping the time-line of 'She's Got To Have It' and 'Do The Right Thing', potentially making Mookie (Do The Right Thing) Mars' father (in She's Got To Have)!

Spike flipping the time-line, and story-line to make this possible-- my wife and I were waiting for Season 3. Heads at Netflix should reconsider their decision.

Not to mention, Spike has his hand on the pulse of America, with the discussions between ADOS and immigrant Blacks, and his masterful capture of sex/love/lust/redemption, where it concerns 'Darling' and her suitors, is at the right temperature.

The development of the next generation of children as players in parents' relationships, and the expansion of heartfelt scenes, in Season 2, captured the acting prowess of the actors involved in bringing Lee's Vision to Life. Heads at Netflix should reconsider their decision.

Tune-In this Sunday at 5:30pm for The Film Review Live: Movie Music Culture Politics Society Podcast on Crayzon Deeyon profile on Facebook, for our thoughts on the potential flip of time and story, and the push to make sure Season 3 is seen, heard, recognized and appreciated.

She's Gotta Have It - Stars DeWanda Wise, Anthony Ramos, Cleo Anthony, Lyriq Bent, Elvis Nolasco, Fat Joe, and a stellar cast.

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Crazy Dee is An Independent Film Reviewer, who is Film Editor at Lordlandfilms.com.


THE FILM REVIEW: MUSIC: OGYG

Posted by Crayzon Deeyon on April 1, 2019 at 10:20 AM Comments comments (0)

THE FILM REVIEW: MUSIC REVIEW ON OGYG BY CRAZY DEE

Let me say first, OGYG is the group that kicks-off TFR: Music Review Show, where we here at the film review expose music that is Hip Hop & Hip Hop influenced, to say-- this is the music we'd like to hear in films-- Independent & Hollywood. So Filmmakers, producers, score/soundtrack compilers-- contact the artists spotlighted on TRF: Music.


Second, Attention Hip Hop Artists and Artists influenced by Hip Hop, submit your songs & videos to The Film Review: Music Review Show. Submit videos and songs to: lordlandenterprises@hotmail.com, include: Your Name, Group Name, Label Affiliation, ISRC Video Code; Contact Number & Contact Email. Label Subject - Attention TFR: Music Review Show.


Now, the 1st The Film Review: Music Review with the first Artist/Group to be reviewed OGYG featuring Issa Twin and I.C. Jonez - 'Woke'. The opening is an introduction to what's to come-- focusing on the melody w/ both Emcees splitting a 16-bar count- Dope! 'Woke' puts one in the mind of UGK's 'International Players Anthem' where Andre 3000, from Outkast, opens w/ a 26-bar verse over the melody from 'I Choose You' by Willie Hutch, establishing the melody of the song before David Banner's beat production drops on the one.


The melody on 'Woke' is mad-crazy! But when the beat drops-- the repetitive hi-hat, with the hand claps, instead of a snare drum, pushes the song. The claps hit while the Emcees place syllables up against it.


The Mix is on point! The bass-line floats in the back, accenting the kick drum, sounding as if it were played with live instrumentation. The greatness of the song is how the producer, BlackMayo, chose to make the bridge the bed Issa Twin and I.C. Jonez flow their collaborative verses-in. Giving the illusion the two are flowing over elements being played by musicians.


The Flow on 'Woke' is now, but gives homage to groups who could trade lines within verses, groups like: Run-DMC, Whodini, Stetsasonic, The World Supreme Team and other great Hip Hop acts!


The Hook/Chorus/Refrain-- the most important part of a song-- finds good standing in the 'Woke' record, as both Issa Twin and I.C. Jonez trade lines w/in the hook, which is catchy and most def-- sing along friendly-- like follow the bouncing ball. It is the topic and topical.


The Verses: tell the story of Hoods Across America, and due to the verses along with the chorus-- 'Woke' can easily become a national and international hit. We here at the film review have coined the style of music OGYG are creating 'Gospel Upliftment Hop'. We rate 'Woke' by OGYG featuring Issa Twin and I.C. Jonez a 10! To Watch the full episode of #TFRLIVESundays to hear the review on OGYG, and to hear the reviews on #UsMovie and #DumboMovie Watch The Film Review on Lordlandfilms.com - Use the navi-bar above to click The Film Review to watch, enjoy!https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZePxfS3B5Go" target="_blank">